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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Early Schools
    Posted: 01 Oct 2008 at 12:51pm

Pleasant Ridge School 1850-1928, 5767 Kennel Rd., 1880 photo.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Oct 2008 at 12:54pm
Trenton School 1866-1907, 300 North Miami St., Trenton. 1866 photo.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Oct 2008 at 10:04am

Madison Twp. Schools that are still standing:

- Astoria #3, 1871-pre1937, 7175 Elk Creek Rd., Astoria/Jacktown, now a church, it is listed in the Ohio Historic Inventory, school had a portable that was moved and is now a house at 7154 Elk Creek Rd.

- Dubbs #11, 1859-1937, 6659 Hetzler Rd., torn down and rebuilt into the house it is today, the original Dubbs schoolhouse is attached and is used as a garage with the blackboard still hanging on the wall and the second building's plaque is in the floor, also referred to as the Hominy Ridge School.

- Elk Creek #4, 1906-1935, 1920 Middletown-Eaton Rd./Rt.122, George Barkman was the architect, it is the second school on the site with the first one being lost to a fire, it is listed in the Ohio Historic Inventory, today it is Westside Pizza.

- (Christian) Fall #7, c1862-1935, 4601 Eck Rd., it is a house today.

- Lower Brown's Run #13, 1874-1937, corner of Cloister Cliffs & Sloebig Rds., burned & rebuilt after 1900, also referred to as the Popular Ridge School, today it is a house.

- Miltonville #8, pre1852/1870-1937, 4473 Elk Creek Rd., Miltonville, originally was a 2 story building but lost top floor in wind, this may be the reason for the record date of 1870, handprints and names can be found at the sidewalk, it is a house today. 
 
- Pike #1, 1861, 7475 Middletown-Germantown Pk./Old Rt.4, school plaque is in the sidewalk, also referred to as Stump School and Poasttown Heights School, a house today.
 
- Pleasant Ridge #10, 1850-1928, 5767 Kennel Rd., outside of Trenton, part of this house may or may not have been the school, but the school sat here.
 
- Poasttown #6, 1857-1937, Middletown-Germantown Rd./Rt.4, Poasttown, it is in the Ohio Historic Inventory, it is a firehouse today, has a millstone and old bell in the yard.
 
- Poasttown Elementary, 1937-2001, Trenton-Franklin Rd., Poasttown, has different uses and businesses in there today, Madison Twp. resident Ruth Slade taught there the first year it opened. 
 
-Trenton #9 1857-1865/66, 303 North Miami St., Trenton, it is in the Ohio Historic Inventory, it is a house today, across the street in the Old Trenton High School yard is a monument and bell from the Trenton School of 1866-1910.
 
- Upper Brown's Run #2, 1859-1937, 7460 Brown's Run Rd., it sits across the creek, a house today.
 
- West Middletown #5, c1926, 601 Hill St., West Middetown, additions in 1937, had been used as the previous board office until 2002, now Old School Contruction has remodeled the building and is housed there.
 
- Woodsdale #12, 1870-1936, 6659 Wayne-Madison Rd., Woodsdale, rebuilt after 1913 Flood, in the Ohio Historic Inventory, also referred to as the Augspurger School, a house today.       
 
- Another possible schoolhouse, which was razed in 1998 to make room for a new subdivision, was a little wooden house at 8855 Keister Rd. (at the corner of Rt.4).  Many others dot the old maps of the Township, with some being replaced with the stucture that is there now, but others with no trace found today. 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote jingle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Oct 2008 at 10:16am
Any idea what school was the one on Hamilton-Trenton Rd going out of Trenton, past Overpeck, going into New Miami?  It's right past the new-ish fire station on the right.  I'm must curious.  I always wondered about it.  It's a neat building and a family lives there now.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Oct 2008 at 10:49am
Those are two schoolhouses that are joined together - St.Clair Twp. School#5 built in 1870 and Williamsdale School built in 1915. They closed in 1937. A hermit lived there for awhile, then it sat empty, then it was going to be the new firehouse, but now is a house.  As far as records indicate, both were built where they are, I would guess for a bigger population of students at that time.   
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Jan 2012 at 10:40pm
Students once learned 3 R's in one-room schoolhouses

.....In Madison Twp. there were originally 13 one-room schools - Pike, Upper Brown's Run, Astoria, Elk Creek, West Middletown, Poasttown, Fall, Miltonville, Trenton, Special District, Dubbs, Woodsdale and Lower Browns Run.
     Pike School was erected in 1861 in the northeast corner of the township.  When it became overcrowded, students were taken to the school in Poasttown.  Erected in 1857, Poasttown School is the oldest area school still standing.  It was enlarged to two rooms and today is the township's north fire station.
     The Upper Browns Run School was built in 1859 on land donated by Lewis Wagner off of his farm.  The Lower Browns Run School was also known as Popular Ridge School since it was surrounded by many popular trees.
     Miltonville was along lower Elk Creek and its brick school was built in 1870.  Named for Christian Fall who donated the land, Fall School closed around World War I and the pupils were transported to Elk Creek School, which still stands along Ohio 122.
     Northeast of Elk Creek School was Dubbs School, which was originally known as Hominy Ridge School.  Almost directly north of Elk Creek School was Astoria School, also known as Jacktown School.  It is located along Elk Creek Road near the county line of Montgomery County.  Remodeled and expanded, the building now houses a church.  Woodsdale School opened in 1870, and in 1909 had a room added.
     West Middletown School began as Madison City School.  The original log schoolhouse was replaced in 1855.  Due to increased enrollment a two-story building was constructed.  Several fires caused considerable damage to the school.  After each it was rebuilt.
     In 1936, the voters passed a bond issue for a consolidated school at Poasttown and an addition to West Middletown School.  The new school opened in 1937 with pupils from Upper and Lower Browns Run, Dubbs, Pike and Poasttown Schools.  Elk Creek pupils, including those of Fall School district had already been assigned to West Middletown in 1935.  For the 1937-38 school year and after, Miltonville students were transported to West Middletown.....

by Roger Miller, Middletown Past, Life, Middletown Journal, January 11, 2012.  
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Feb 2014 at 10:04pm

One Room Schools of Ohio

By J. Larry Helton, Jr. – 2012

 

      In 1825, the state of Ohio established a law that permitted counties to set up public school districts within their townships, supported with tax money.

     Before that time, schools were private or by subscription, costing several dollars for a child’s education.  A board that consisted of township trustees and community members governed school policies, finances, hiring of a teacher, and construction of a building.

     After acquiring a 1-acre lot, donated by an area farmer, the board decided who was going to build, what materials were needed, and the total coast.  The average cost for a wood or a brick building, during the late 1800s and early 1900s, was $900.

     The plan was to construct a schoolhouse every one to two miles apart throughout the township.  This goal was never achieved. 

     Often, a local carpenter or builder was sought out for the task.  However, if funds were low, the community would work together in the construction of their schoolhouse.

     Great importance was put upon learning the 3Rs (reading, ‘riting, & ‘rithmetic) in a building that was designed to allow plenty of fresh air, light, and space.  Communities were proud of their schools.

     A few of the first schools were made of flat rock, such as Preble County’s oldest, one- room school named Kumler, located at 6704 SR503 in Harrison Twp.  Most early schools were made of hand-hewn logs from nearby woods. The roof and door were of clapboard, while the floor was dirt or wood.  Glass was expensive, so oiled paper or animal skins were used as window coverings.  A clay and rock chimney housed the fireplace.  One such school, the Burnett Schoolhouse, built in the early 1800s, was moved from Shandon and is restored at the Governor Bebb MetroPark at Okeana.

     Later, one-room schoolhouses were made of wood planks or slats, such as the one in Monroe, built in 1850, at 130 Elm Street.  The overall structure was very similar to the brick buildings that replaced them.  By the 1870s, the majority of the schools being built were of red brick, sometimes fired at the site. The Trenton one-room school built in 1850, located at 303 North Miami Street is an excellent example of the schoolhouses of that time. 

     The rectangular buildings ranged from 22 by 30 feet to 40 by 80 feet, with a ceiling height of 11 feet to 11 feet 6 inches. It had a clapboard door between two front windows that usually faced the road. 

     A few of the schools had two doors – as did some churches at the time – one for boys and the other for girls.  Three to four windows were along the side that could be protected with hinged wood shutters when school was out.  Occasionally, a back door or false windows could be found on the rear of the building. 

     Most of the schools had a bell tower, either for looks or for the purpose of housing a bell that could be rung with an indoor rope.  The brick chimney protruded through the roof in different places, depending on the position of the stove inside.

     Sandstone plaques were a few feet above the door, engraved with the district, number, year of construction, and sometimes the name of the school or builder.

     Roofing consisted of wood or slate shingles, replaced later with metal or asphalt.  Full and half basements, though rare, were found in some schools for use as storage space.

     By the mid-1890s, vestibules were a common addition that enhanced the school’s entrance.  Woodsdale School built in 1870, at 6659 Wayne-Madison Rd., has this feature.

     The interior of the schoolhouse contained a wood floor that had a raised platform or rostrum at the front of the room for the teacher’s desk.  Student desks, which replaced earlier benches, were arranged in rows with an aisle down the middle.

     The inside walls and ceilings were covered with wainscoting or plaster.  In 1837, the front walls were being painted black and used as the first chalkboards.  Then in the 1880s, slate chalkboards were becoming common in the classroom.

     Ledges near the windows held oil lamps or candles during the darker days of winter.  Replacing the fireplace, the pot-bellied stove was stocked with wood or coal from the nearby bucket.

     Early schools showed their patriotism with pictures of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, along with displaying flags inside and out.  State maps were made of linen. Coats were hung on nails or hooks about the room, until coatrooms became popular in the 1890s.

     Needs other than educational were fulfilled outdoors. A well was dug in the front or to the side of the building, far from the privies out back.  A pump was installed and water was drunk from a tin cup.  Privies or outhouses were built of wood, a few of bricks, and were always traditional parts of the one-room school setting.  Playground equipment was very limited, consisting of wood swings and seesaws.

     By the mid to late 1920s many one-room schools were being closed and districts consolidated to centralized locations, with buildings of multiple rooms, and all of the grades being in one building.  One local school district, Madison Local Schools, can boast that all of their nine one room school buildings still remain intact, that served its students prior to consolidating by 1937. 

     According to the National Trust for Historic Preservation, 830 of the 200,000 one- room schools of 1900 were still being used 100 years later in the United States.  However, the last ones closed and consolidated in the 1950s in Butler and Preble Counties.

    There are still many of these one-room schoolhouses throughout our local area and throughout Ohio that serve a variety of purposes: as houses, churches, corncribs, barns, and storage, to name a few.  Others sit there abandoned and rotting away. While others are long gone with only a trace of its former days: wells, pumps, steps, foundations, sidewalks, or shade trees. 

     “The education of yesterday belongs to history.  The children, the teachers, and the schools are but a memory.  Yet they are a part of tomorrow.  The past is always with us.  It is the foundation on which we build.” -John J. Loeper, “Going to School in 1876”.

 


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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Feb 2014 at 10:20pm
Featured in the Real Estate Plus, Middletown Journal, May 22, 2010:
 
     "A time in history and a home for today.
     1874 one-room school house has been beautifully restored.
     A time in history, a home for today is certainly a phrase that captures the essence of the home at 6575 Sloebig Road in 
     Madison Twp.
     Built about 1874 as a one-room schoolhouse.....
     This home has only had three owners....."
 
- Lower Brown's Run #13, 1874-1937, 65765 Sloebig Rd., burned & rebuilt after 1900, also referred to as the Popular Ridge School, today it is a house. (my notes)
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2016 at 12:38pm
Woodsdale School House razed May 2016.  Sandstone plaque and some bricks were saved by an employee of the wrecking company.  He owns the office building of the long gone paper mill that was once at Woodsdale and plans are to display the plaque there. 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Apr 2017 at 4:03pm
On the 1836 McBride's map, there existed a schoolhouse on the southwestern corner of Section 10 on the property of Abner Enoch. The location of the schoolhouse would be directly south of the Michael Rd. and Diver Rd. intersection in what would be a wooded field today. The map shows no access road to the schoolhouse at that time.     
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Post Options Post Options   Quote wildbill Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Apr 2017 at 3:08am
Lol, ok Larry I know the area you speak of here, but please explain what a wooded field is. Is it a field full of trees or a....I'm confused.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Apr 2017 at 6:24pm
Scott, How about both a field and trees? I'll call it a mixture pasture if that helps you.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote wildbill Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Apr 2017 at 12:13am
Ok, that helps. Nice to know where all these old schools used to be.
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