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Wildlife History II

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LHelton View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Wildlife History II
    Posted: 29 Mar 2016 at 4:02pm
Dear Mr. Helton,

Thank you for reaching out to MetroParks with your question. MetroParks appreciates your efforts to determine if the information you were given was indeed factual.

I can report to you that there have been no sightings, videos or photographs reported to MetroParks of Butler County that include large cats on the properties owned or managed by MetroParks.

Perhaps your source may be conveying what they heard about or saw regarding a photo taken by a naturalist at the Federally owned Fernald Nature Preserve, which is located in Butler County. At this nature preserve a naturalist captured a picture of a bobcat on a trail camera. Below is a link of this report/photo that can be found on Great Parks website. However, if you look closely at the timestamp on the photo it was taken in October 2012.

http://blog.greatparks.org/2012/12/wild-ohio-making-a-comeback/

I hope this adequately answers your question. Should you ever have additional questions regarding MetroParks, please feel free to reach out again.   Again, thank you for your responsible actions to confirm the facts.

Respectfully,

Kelly J. Barkley
Sr. Manager of Community Relations
MetroParks of Butler County
(O) 513.867.5835 (F) 513.867.5954
kbarkley@yourmetroparks.net

MetroParks of Butler County……NOW THAT’S FAMILY FUN!
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The Mission of the MetroParks of Butler County is to provide a superior park system that maximizes the community’s quality of life through conservation, education and recreation.
Larry Helton - Historical Society of Madison Twp.
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LHelton View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LHelton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Feb 2017 at 5:39pm
Bobcats move back into southwest Ohio, including Butler County
Joe Rosemeyer WCPO 9 On Your Side
Feb. 24, 2017
BUTLER COUNTY

If you want to see a bobcat in the wild, you don’t need to drive across the state: They’re back in southwest Ohio and have been for more than a decade, wildlife officials said.

You’ll just need to be very lucky — or happen upon a very unlucky bobcat.

That was apparently the case with one struck by a vehicle in Butler County earlier this month.

A Facebook post shared by Diane Phelps shows what appears to be a dead bobcat in the back of a pickup truck.

“Just a heads up, this was hit in Shandon!” the post from Feb. 13 says. “I know there have been some sightings in town.”

Brett Beatty, wildlife management supervisor with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, said the carcass has been turned over to the state as required by law.

Bobcats are a protected species, so it’s illegal to hunt or keep them, even animals accidentally killed.

Although bobcats are more commonly sighted in southeast Ohio — it’s the mascot of Ohio University in Athens, after all — they’re rare in Greater Cincinnati.

Fernald Preserve, near where the bobcat mentioned above was struck, has had sightings since at least 2012. Beatty said he’s heard of bobcats in the western part of the state, which his district covers, ever since he started working the area 15 years ago.

Unlike coyotes, another carnivore living in the Tri-State, bobcats are native to Ohio. They were wiped out in the mid-1800s as they lost their habitat to farming and logging, and because of unregulated trapping and hunting.

And unlike coyotes, you probably won’t see bobcats close to the city.

“They are definitely less tolerant of people, so you typically don’t see them in urban environments like you do with the coyotes,” Beatty said.

Scientists believe southwest Ohio’s bobcats are likely moving in from Indiana. It’s possible, but less likely, some may have swum over from Kentucky, Beatty said.

Like a housecat, bobcats are ambush predators — they like to hide and pounce — so they prefer dense brush and woods. And they’re incredibly secretive: Beatty said you could have a bobcat living nearby and never know.

Bobcats hunt small mammals like rabbits, squirrels and mice; there have also been reports of bobcats killing a small deer, Beatty said.

On Facebook, a few people wrote they were worried about their pets. Although coyotes have been known to snatch cats and small dogs, you probably don’t need to worry about bobcats, Beatty said.

“I’ve heard reports from other places where ducks or backyard chickens might be an issue, where they’ve come in and taken them,” he said.

A typical bobcat is about 20-25 pounds but appears to be much larger because they have long legs. They’re generally gray or brown, with a light-colored, speckled underside and white marks on the backs of their ears.

Their distinctive whiskers, almost like a beard, make a bobcat stand out, along with a bobbed tail about 4 inches long.

“If you see a cat with a long tail, that’s not a bobcat,” Beatty said.

Southeast Ohio has breeding pairs, and Beatty said the population seems to be doing well and here to stay.

If you want to improve your odds of seeing a bobcat in the wild, ODNR’s website says to try forested areas in:

Belmont County
Monroe County
Morgan County
Noble County
Washington County
Larry Helton - Historical Society of Madison Twp.
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